• Take a pass

    Again this year, the library is happy to offer passes for a variety of attractions as well as the state parks. State park passes are day passes that allow entrance for up to eight people in one vehicle. Other passes we have available include Billings Farm & Museum, ECHO, Hildene, Vermont Historic Sites, Shelburne Farms, […]

  • Tax forms available …

    Most federal tax forms and booklets have arrived. The state is not sending out stacks of tax forms to libraries, town halls and post offices this year. But that doesn’t stop us from sending out stacks of information about how to get your hands on the forms. See the page at http://rutlandfree.org/tax-forms/

  • MSJ Yearbooks now online

    From our friends at Rutland Historical Society: MSJ yearbooks (1939-1993 except 1943 which was not published) is online at the Historical Society website.

  • Tech help available

    Have a particular technology question? Need help with a new device or want to learn how to access library services through your tablet or computer? Call ahead or just drop in for help, Mondays and Fridays noon to 2 PM.

  • New source for e-books

    OneClick!digital has now added a selection of classic books to its offerings. There are no checkout limits, holds or waits … perfect for class reading lists.

  • OneClick has your audiobook

    Check out an audiobook from OneClick Digital with your library card … no limits or wait times. iPhone app now available, and find a wide assortment of audio classes as well.

  • Try TumbleBooks ebooks for Kids!

    Click on the Kids Space tab to access TumbleBooks! Find animated, talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and Read-Alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration.)

  • Reader’s Corner

    Reader’s Corner (which you can find in the left-hand menu, and the top menu) features all the resources you need about books in our library. There are links to InterLibrary Loan and a request form for new books and dvds. Check it out today!

First Wednesdays

From October through May, join us the First Wednesday of the month at 7PM for a humanities lecture series curated by the Vermont Humanities Council. The program is sponsored locally by the Friends of the Rutland Free Library and Rutland Regional Medical Center

Here are the details for this season:

October 3
Ethan Allen and Lake Champlain
Historian and author Willard Stern Randall shares the remarkable Revolution-era history of Ethan Allen on Lake Champlain – from his arrival as a big game hunter to his buying and selling thousands of acres of land, from his leading the Green Mountain Boys in attacking Fort Ticonderoga to two decades of confrontation over statehood. Sponsor: Lake Champlain Basin Program


November 7
The original Renaissance Man: Understanding Leonardo da Vinci

Famed for paintings such as The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci was also a dedicated observer and a prolific journal writer. Middlebury College professor Katy Smith Abbot considers what set him apart, then and now.


December 5
Building Monticello

Thomas Jefferson never knew the Monticello we visit today – in perfect condition, impeccably furnished. Jefferson died so deeply in debt that his surviving child was forced to auction off the house and contents. Dartmouth college senior lecturer Marlene Heck explains the lifelong project Jefferson called his ‘essay in architecture.’

January 2
Daily Life in Prewar nazi Germany

Focusing on the prewar experience of non-Jewish citizens, Keene State professor Paul Vincent examines how ideology and terror undermined human digmity, numbed self-awareness, and atomized German society.

February 6
McKibben on Climate Change

Author and environmentalist Bill McKibben explains how both the science and politics of climate change have unfolded and are unfolding, here and around the globe.


March 6
Chris Bohjalian: Fiction’s Getting to the Truth

Acclaimed novelist Chris Bohjalian talks about his mos recent novel. Sponsor: The Vermont Country Store

April 3
Literary Paris: the 1920s in the City of Light

Dartmouth professor Barbara Will considers how Paris, long a beacon to writers, artists, and musicians, became a global meeting ground for creative individuals in the 1920s and a crucible for the artistic movement known as modernism.

May 1
The Evolution of Sports Writing

Sports Illustrated senior writer Alexander Wolff traces how journalism’s ‘toy department’ has responded to social movements, the rise of televised sport, and the digital revolution – from Grantland Rice to Bill Simmons