• Book sale today! 4-8 PM downstairs

    Spring books & more sale on Monday, April 13 … DVDs, VHS, puzzles, software, comics, more. Great prices, great people!

  • Family karaoke, Saturday, April 11, 4 PM

    Join the fun of a group singalong in a relaxed, no-sweaty-palms atmosphere, upstairs in the Fox Room, with Director Abby Noland.

  • Calling all kids for a LEGO┬« Challenge – Wed. May 13th @ 3:45 pm in the Fox Room

    Join us in the Fox Room for an afternoon of fun. The library and the Boys & Girls Club have put out over 10,000 LEGO® building bricks for a building challenge. Suggested for school age children.

  • MSJ Yearbooks now online

    From our friends at Rutland Historical Society: MSJ yearbooks (1939-1993 except 1943 which was not published) is online at the Historical Society website.

  • New source for e-books

    OneClick!digital has now added a selection of classic books to its offerings. There are no checkout limits, holds or waits … perfect for class reading lists.

  • OneClick has your audiobook

    Check out an audiobook from OneClick Digital with your library card … no limits or wait times. iPhone app now available, and find a wide assortment of audio classes as well.

  • Try TumbleBooks ebooks for Kids!

    Click on the Kids Space tab to access TumbleBooks! Find animated, talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and Read-Alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration.)

  • Reader’s Corner

    Reader’s Corner (which you can find in the left-hand menu, and the top menu) features all the resources you need about books in our library. There are links to InterLibrary Loan and a request form for new books and dvds. Check it out today!

The Town that Food Saved

The Town that Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food, by Ben Hewitt (2010) – In 2009, amid the double dip economic recession, the small town of Hardwick, Vermont was adding jobs in a handful of businesses practicing sustainable agriculture and promoting local foods. This much I already knew from following Hardwick in the media during that time. What I liked about this book is that it gave a voice to some of the folks that the media reporting left out: operators of a mobile slaughtering unit, back to the land anarchists, and aging farmers from another era. A lot has been written about Hardwick’s successes since then, but this book serves as an introduction and playbook to community economic development in the region. (EG)

338.1974 HEW or try the library catalog