• Take a pass

    Again this year, the library is happy to offer passes for a variety of attractions as well as the state parks. State park passes are day passes that allow entrance for up to eight people in one vehicle. Other passes we have available include Billings Farm & Museum, ECHO, Hildene, Vermont Historic Sites, Shelburne Farms, […]

  • Babies and toddlers rock, Monday, 10 AM

    Music and movement for our youngest users to get you started Monday mornings.

  • Tax forms available …

    Most federal tax forms and booklets have arrived. The state is not sending out stacks of tax forms to libraries, town halls and post offices this year. But that doesn’t stop us from sending out stacks of information about how to get your hands on the forms. See the page at http://rutlandfree.org/tax-forms/

  • MSJ Yearbooks now online

    From our friends at Rutland Historical Society: MSJ yearbooks (1939-1993 except 1943 which was not published) is online at the Historical Society website.

  • Tech help available

    Have a particular technology question? Need help with a new device or want to learn how to access library services through your tablet or computer? Call ahead or just drop in for help, Mondays and Fridays noon to 2 PM.

  • New source for e-books

    OneClick!digital has now added a selection of classic books to its offerings. There are no checkout limits, holds or waits … perfect for class reading lists.

  • OneClick has your audiobook

    Check out an audiobook from OneClick Digital with your library card … no limits or wait times. iPhone app now available, and find a wide assortment of audio classes as well.

  • Try TumbleBooks ebooks for Kids!

    Click on the Kids Space tab to access TumbleBooks! Find animated, talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and Read-Alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration.)

Reader’s Review

One my perks for volunteering at the Rutland Free Library over the years was recently being invited to attend “Table of Contents” — a lovely sit-down dinner, with the opportunity to meet and talk with 14 Vermont authors. Doug Wilhelm, who also happens to be one of our library patrons, was one of the guest authors. He has written more than ten books for young readers;
I’ve just finished reading two of them: The Revealers and True Shoes.

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The Revealers is a novel about three 7th graders who are being bullied and ostracized in school, and about the positive, creative ways they figure out to deal with it. True Shoes is a sequel, involving the same three kids and some of their friends, focusing on cliques and the social pressures on 8th graders. The stories are told in the first person by Russell Trainor (one of the original three kids). His thoughts, emotions, confusion, feelings of justice and loyalty, initial sense of helplessness, and need for keeping silent are beautifully described. The dialog just couldn’t be better.

Even though these two books were initially written for young readers, I think they should be given as much general public exposure as possible. I was lucky not to have experienced much of that negativity growing up, so, as an adult, I have found these books extremely enlightening. Even if I had known what it was like, I still wouldn’t have known how today’s technology has made it MUCH WORSE. Intimidation can be anonymous and reputations instantly ruined through the spreading of lies via group e-mailings.

You may be, or know, one of those kids who is going through their difficult teens and suffering the additional burdens of bullying and social pressures. These books can help.

Here is Doug’s website: www.dougwilhelm.com – Susan Beard