• Play group at new time, 9:30 AM Fridays

    The library is pleased to be partners with Rutland County Parent Child Center. Together we will host play groups Friday mornings in the Fox Room from 9:30-11 AM. Always free and open to all.

  • MSJ Yearbooks now online

    From our friends at Rutland Historical Society: MSJ yearbooks (1939-1993 except 1943 which was not published) is online at the Historical Society website.

  • New source for e-books

    OneClick!digital has now added a selection of classic books to its offerings. There are no checkout limits, holds or waits … perfect for class reading lists.

  • OneClick has your audiobook

    Check out an audiobook from OneClick Digital with your library card … no limits or wait times. iPhone app now available, and find a wide assortment of audio classes as well.

  • Try TumbleBooks ebooks for Kids!

    Click on the Kids Space tab to access TumbleBooks! Find animated, talking picture books with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, and Read-Alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration.)

  • Reader’s Corner

    Reader’s Corner (which you can find in the left-hand menu, and the top menu) features all the resources you need about books in our library. There are links to InterLibrary Loan and a request form for new books and dvds. Check it out today!

  • Twilight Read Alikes

    Don’t be embarrassed if you loved Twilight, you are in good company. Adult or teen if you liked the fast paced, addictive nature of the Twlight series by Stephanie Meyers you will love these books. Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater Grace is obsessed with the wolves that roam the woods behind her house. She is drawn […]

  • Events List

    List of Upcoming Events will go here

Patron Book Review

HOLD IT ‘TIL IT HURTS, by T. Geronimo Johnson

After hearing the interview with the author on public radio, I thought this powerful book would be about the complexities of race: black children raised by white parents, and their not fitting into either the white or black community. But it was so much more than that. The story begins as brothers, Achilles and Troy, return from the war in Afghanistan to learn that their father has just died. Their mother hands them sealed envelopes from their father, telling them about their birth parents. Achilles can’t open his; Troy does, reads it, and then leaves immediately for parts unknown. Achilles is the older and had always been Troy’s protector. The rest of the book is Achilles’ obsessive search for his brother, following tips that Troy had been seen in various cities. The writing is spiral and can be very confusing at times. Much of it covers incidents that occurred in Afghanistan — sometimes in the form of memories, dreams or hallucinations in the present, without clarification as to which. But they reveal the most intimate thoughts and emotions (or lack of them) at the time. This story has given me a much clearer picture of the brainwashing that must prepare recruits for war-readiness, the horror they must endure, and then the abrupt transition they face when coming home to loving people who have no basis of comparison in their own lives. Although billed as a novel, this book reads like an autobiography. I feel that Hold It ‘Til It Hurts is a book that all of us who have never been to war should read for better understanding.

Susan Beard